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What are some excellent photography tips?

Sccott

New member
Here's the scenario for this question.

Christine is a taking photography classes and she wants to make good grades in it so she can receive her photography diploma. She just started classes and already has a digital camera. If you are the teacher, what would be some basic or adept photography tips would you tell to Christine?
 

allamericangirl8

New member
When you're taking a picture of a moving object, make sure that object is placed opposite it's direction. For instance if you have a runner running to the left, make sure he's positioned to the right.

I'm awful at explaining things.
 

DigitalDan

New member
I was a professional photographer. I think the best class I ever took was "Commercial Art and Advanced Design." Art Design tells you how to lead your eye to the subject through lead lines, subject contrast, color contrast, framing your picture, negative space, etc... I know that may sound unusual to take an art class - design. But, that is the training that teaches the elements of a good picture.
 

DigitalDan

New member
I hope and trust that Christine doesn't have a point and shoot camera. She needs to learn f/stops and shutter speeds and what the various combination's will achieve. The same goes for wide angle verses telephoto. There is more to which one to use than you would think.

EXAMPLES:

If you took a close up of a flower with a stream in the distance: If you kept the flower at the same size and changed form wide angle to telephoto, the background would be larger in the picture because distance is compressed with telephoto.

She needs a single lens reflex and preferably a full image in the viewfinder A lot of digital cameras only use a portion of what they see. That increases the effective millimeters of a lens. For portrains (head and shoulder) the perfect millimeter setting is 105mm because it presents the best - normal appearance of the head.

Larger f/stops reduce the focus of the background. That is better for portraits because the head has a lot less distraction behind it and the face stands out.

These are just a couple things to let you know that there is more to a good picture that point and shoot won't get you.
 

The Nanook

Active member
Black and white and grain can be good, if used right. And I agree with what robin said above: take a ton of photos. Professional photographers take thousands of pictures per shoot and only use maybe 10 to be printed or published.
 

wonton

Active member
always practice practice practice. don't be afraid to try new compositions. take a step back and observe. change your vantage point. learn what aperture and shutter speed are and how to use them properly.
 

allamericangirl8

New member
always practice practice practice. don't be afraid to try new compositions. take a step back and observe. change your vantage point. learn what aperture and shutter speed are and how to use them properly.

That stuff is so annoying to learn, but so useful afterward! I used to get both dials mixed up.
 

DigitalDan

New member
Boiling it down:


  • Composition can't be over emphasized. It can separate amateur from professional photos.
  • Lighting - ask any professional photographer - this is number one!
  • Use the entire frame. A lot of people don't use the whole frame and have to crop to their subject. This loses resolution.
  • Learn about the importance of edges and negative space.
  • Learn about exposure and depth of field. Learning how to control what is in focus and what is out of focus can draw the eye to a subject.
  • Learn f/stops and shutter speeds and what they can do for you.
  • Learn about choosing the right focal length lens. This is for making people look their best, compressing distance when more effective, etc..
  • Learn all of the camera settings even if you don't use them all of the time.
  • Learn what accessories are available that can make your pictures better.
  • Learn how to judge tonal contrast/value. This can be more important than color. One thing I learned to help which you photo class won't teach you (learned in the art class) - squint when looking at a subject. It makes the subject almost b&w so that you can see what is darker or lighter to make sure the subject separates from the things around it.
  • Like Wonton said - take a lot of pictures. Not only does it help develop and eye but it makes the camera an extension of yourself.
 
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mdlance

New member
It is usually best for the photographer to have the sun at their back. Look for shadows in your view finder.Photographing sunset is the common desire of all the photographers.But what sets the sunset apart for the rest of the sunsets.Christine has to know tips about good photo shooting.
 

Connell01

New member
First of all I would like to say thanks to MR: Dan who have shared such nice information with us. I am also very curious about the photography and I just bought a New Canon digital camera which have excellent result. but I want to learn how to maintain a picture graphically ? so please suggest me software with tutorial so that I could learn easily.Transportable Homes
 
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